1. HOME
  2. Policies
  3. Policies
  4. Topics
  5. Law-Related Education
  6. Teaching Materials for High School Students

Teaching Materials for High School Students

Teaching Materials for High School Students

Law-Related Education for the Future ~For a Free and Fair Society~

 Teaching materials for teachers (created in FY 2018) to carry out law-related education for high school students.
 
 These teaching materials were created to make it easy for teachers who have been involved in law-related education, as well as those who have experienced hesitation when working with law-related education in classes.
 Organizing what is thought to be particularly necessary to learn at the high school level in the three themes of "rulemaking (thinking about how rules should be)", "private law and contracts", and "dispute resolution and the judiciary", teaching plans are presented for actual classes based on the Course of Study. In addition, these contents, which include worksheets, can be used immediately for those engaged in law-related education for the first time.

 The materials were created on the assumption that they would be used in the new "Public" class that was established in the high school Course of Study notified in March 2018, but they can also be used in the civics class “Contemporary Society” and “Politics and Economy” in the high school Course of Study notified in March 2009.



 Download all teaching materials together here[PDF]

 If you would like to receive booklets, please direct your inquiries to:
   2nd Judicial System Section, Judicial System Division, Judicial System Department, Minister’s Secretariat, Ministry of Justice
   E-mail : houkyouiku@i.moj.go.jp
   

Content of teaching materials

  
 Introduction[PDF]

 Rulemaking (Thinking about How Rules Should Be)
Overview

[PDF]
Setting up cases where multiple views conflict on public matters and cases in which one's freedoms conflict with those of another, splitting students into different positions and arguing for different opinions, students will examine the “significance and necessity of rules”, “fairness of procedures”, and “viewpoints evaluating the contents of rules” by forming a consensus and creating rules.
[Teaching plan (1)]

Let’s make a consensus ~Where should the bridge be built?~

[PDF] / [Word/compressed file]
 
Students will experience the process of consensus-building through a case where interests conflict over the construction site of a bridge on a remote island which is a World Heritage candidate site, and learn about the points to be noted at that time.
[Teaching plan (2)]

Let’s think about new rules ~The village with no rules~ 

[PDF] / [Word/compressed file]
 
Through the case of a village where there are no rules, students will study mainly the significance of rules while examining what kind of problems can arise if there are no rules in the first place.
[Teaching plan (3)]

Let’s make rules when using the beach 

[PDF] / [Word/compressed file]
 
Through the case where various problems have occurred with the increase in users, students will study the viewpoints evaluating the contents of rules while considering rules for solving problems.
[Teaching plan (4)]

Let’s think about affirmative action for university entrance exams 

[PDF] / [Word/compressed file]
 
With regard to measures taken by universities that set up a recruitment limit for a race in a university entrance examination in a country where rabbits and turtles live, students will learn about whether it is necessary to consider the necessity and contents of amending existing laws and rules by having them consider whether measures are considered fair or what kind of measures would be fair, and thinking about the reasons for their introduction based on material such as data.
 Private law and contracts
Overview    
     
[PDF]     
Through specific examples, students will understand the principle of private autonomy (the principle of the freedom of contract) and the basic concept of contracts, which is the basic idea of private law, and understand that there are exceptions to the principle of freedom of contract.
[Teaching plan]

What is a contract?

[PDF] / [Word/compressed file]

Using the old story of "Peach Boy", students will think about the contract between Peach Boy and the monkey, and then investigate the troubles that arose from it and learn about the basic ideas of a contract. In addition, they will learn about exceptions to the principle of the freedom of contract through cases about a part-time job at a convenience store and e-commerce.
  Dispute resolution and the judiciary
Overview

[PDF]
Through the dispute resolution process by courts and simulated criminal trial proceedings, students will understand fairly the arguments of concerned parties from the standpoint of a third party, organize the issues, cultivate the power to resolve disputes based on the law, and experience the significance and role of the judiciary, and the characteristics of civil and criminal trial proceedings.
[Teaching plan (1)]

Civil dispute resolution (1) ~Civil trial Responsibility for injuries~

[PDF] / [Word/compressed file]
 
Through simulating the dispute resolution process by courts (civil trial) for a dispute that cannot be resolved by discussions among the parties, students will understand fairly the arguments of concerned parties from the standpoint of a third party, organize the issues, cultivate the power to resolve disputes based on the law, and experience the significance and role of the judiciary.
[Teaching plan (2)]

Civil dispute resolution ~Simulated mediation Fighting over smells~ 

[PDF] / [Word/compressed file]
 
Through simulating the dispute resolution process by courts (civil mediation) for a dispute that cannot be resolved by discussions among the parties, students will understand fairly the arguments of concerned parties from the standpoint of a third party, organize the issues, cultivate the power to resolve disputes based on the law, and experience the significance and role of the judiciary.
[Teaching plan (3)]

Criminal mock trial ~Is the accused the “perpetrator”?~ 

[PDF] / [Word/compressed file]
 
Students will experience the characteristics of criminal trials through simulating the criminal trial process for a robbery resulting in bodily injury where it is not clear whether the accused is the perpetrator or not.
 

Adobe Readerのダウンロードページへ

    Adobe Reader is required to view PDF files.
    If you do not have Adobe Reader, please download it from the link on the banner for free.
    The linked site is operated by Adobe Systems.

* The above plug-in download link is current as of April 2015.